City guide

Movies screening in English in Budapest: October 2019

If you don’t speak Hungarian but want to see a film in Budapest, it can be difficult to find out which ones are showing in English. Luckily, many cinemas and film clubs screen newly released features and classic flicks with English subtitles and/or with the original audio. Each month we share some movies to check out, with links to the show times too, so you’ll know exactly which cinema to head to and when. Cinema City is a chain of multiplexes, Artmozi the network of art-house theatres. All you need do is grab some popcorn!

Ad Astra

Brad Pitt plays an astronaut travelling through the Solar System on a quest to find his father, Tommy Lee Jones, a fellow spaceman gone rogue. Pitt earned universal praise for his performance. James Gray (The Lost City of Z) directs.

 

English-friendly screenings at art-house cinemas.

 

Curtiz

First-time Hungarian director Yvan Tamás Topolánszky made the brave decision to focus his debut movie on one of the most famous films ever made, Casablanca, and the legendary fellow Hungarian director behind it, Michael Curtiz. Firmly noir and brimming with irony, Curtiz was mainly written by Ward Parry, whose snappy English dialogue is interspersed with sub-plots in Hungarian – subtitles are provided throughout. Budapest is a closed, terrified city inaccessible by phone, Hollywood is one long casting couch swathed in cigarette smoke. Well worth a watch. Read our interview with the key players here.

 

English-friendly screenings at art-house cinemas.

 

Downton Abbey

Adapted for the silver screen, the Crawley clan continue where they left off in the smash hit TV series, only this time there’s royalty to entertain at their Yorkshire country manor. This classic period drama stars most of the original cast – what’s a period drama without Dame Maggie Smith? – and leaves plenty of scope for a revisit.

 

English-friendly screenings at Cinema City and at art-house cinemas.

 

It Chapter Two

A true nightmare from our childhood, Pennywise, is back again. Defeated by members of the Losers’ Club, the evil clown returns 27 years later to terrorise the town of Derry, Maine, once again. Now adults, the childhood friends have long since gone their separate ways. But when people start disappearing, Mike Hanlon calls the others home for one final stand. Damaged by scars from the past, the united Losers must conquer their deepest fears to destroy the shape-shifting Pennywise — now more powerful than ever.

 

English-friendly screenings at Cinema City.

 

Joker

Forever alone in a crowd, failed comedian Arthur Fleck seeks connection as he walks the streets of Gotham City. Arthur wears two masks — the one he paints for his day job as a clown, and the guise he projects in a futile attempt to feel like he’s part of the world around him. Isolated, bullied and disregarded by society, Fleck begins a slow descent into madness as he transforms into the criminal mastermind known as the Joker.

 

English-friendly screenings at Cinema City.

 

Once Upon a Time in… Hollywood

Nominated for Best Film at Cannes, winner of its Palm Dog award thanks to a chompingly good performance by Sayuri the pit bull terrier, this eagerly awaited take by Quentin Tarantino on Manson-era LA is up there with his best work. Starring a hilarious Leonardo DiCaprio as an over-the-hump TV cowboy and his stunt double, Brad Pitt, Once Upon a Time is a celluloid love letter to Hollywood. Underscored by a reliably inspiring Tarantino soundtrack – Neil Diamond has never sounded so good – this 160-minute journey through the summer of ’69 also features cameos from Al Pacino and Bruce Dern, and a fictional Steve McQueen.

 

English-friendly screenings at Cinema City and at art-house cinemas.

 

Those Who Remained

Hungarian director Barnabás Tóth’s post-Holocaust drama is a tender tale of the relationship of two survivors and their lives between 1948 and 1953.

 

English-friendly screenings at the Művész cinema.