City guide

Free eco-friendly map shows how to go green in Budapest

Photo : Green Guide Budapest

A new fold-out map, Green Guide Budapest, shows the city’s parks and markets, eco-design shops and planet-friendly eateries, package-free outlets and organic stores. It looks great, there’s an English version – and it’s free!

The long-cherished dream of the team at nature-inspired creatives RisoPlant has been a project that focuses on sustainable Budapest – and to help engender a community around it.

Photo: Green Guide Budapest

Thanks to the crowd-funded work of Niki Konkoly, Mimma Nosek and Dávid Erdész, a small pocket map has just been created.

 

Printed by the energy-saving riso method, the map immediately hones in on parks and markets as important hubs rather than the usual attractions and tourist destinations.

Photo: Green Guide Budapest

With the index on either side, you can search for venues by their exact address in Buda or Pest, each also given a short description by category. Names such as Printa, Stilshop and the Silent Concept Store are already familiar to many as co-design and gift shops.

 

Places that offer planet-friendly food should have vegetarian and vegan options where possible, and packaging that focuses on sustainability. Ideally they should source from local producers and use organic ingredients. There was no absolute requirement for every single criterion to be met, but the overall direction of each venue was important.

Photo: Green Guide Budapest

In addition to producers’ markets, it’s nice to see traditional marketplaces on the map. The growing number of package-free shops is obviously included, as are community sites dedicated to environmental issues such as the Humusz Alliance involved in waste prevention, HelloAnyu! eco café for young mums and Cargonomia cycle/organic vegetable centre. Plus, all selective waste-collection points are pinpointed, with a link to their exact location.

 

Along with the release of the paper map, soon to be available at all the venues featured on it, an online version (website Hungarian-only) has been launched, with more developments expected in the future. The print version is the first step in a long journey – the creators are full of plans and ideas.