Dining

Lisboa Pastry & Bakery brings a first taste of Portugal to Budapest

Photo : Sándor Csudai / WLB

Pastel de nata, pampilho, Jesuíta, francesinhas and muffins – if you like Portuguese pastries, head straight to the new Lisboa Pastry & Bakery in the Gozsdu Udvar. And if you’re not familiar with them, you’re in for a treat – the pastry chef, originally from near Lisbon, relocated to Budapest especially for this job.

Portuguese pastries are generally made with a lot of egg yolk and sugar, and look amazing. Budapest’s new Lisboa Pastry & Bakery now brings these tasteful and authentic treats to the Hungarian capital.

Photo: Sándor Csudai / WLB

Even though huge signs show where it is, the bakery is not so easy to find the first time unless you’re approaching from Madách tér. If you’re coming from Holló utca, turn right straight after passing the Léhűtő bar.

Photo: Sándor Csudai / WLB

Lisboa is an authentic bakery and confectionery in one – in the Portuguese capital, these go hand in hand. And by authentic, we mean that half of the team comes from this part of Iberia. Pastry chef Daniel Sousa relocated to Budapest – where he had never been before – especially for this job.

Photo: Sándor Csudai / WLB

We asked him about the bakery, and found out that he loved Budapest, preferring buzzing Pest to the more chilled-out Buda side. He told us that sweet pastries are more characteristic of the south in Portugal, where something sweet is sold on every corner (“up north they cook, down south they bake”). It is almost a tradition that the head of the family makes their way to these kind of places to fetch fresh breakfast for the others. Lisboa would like to bring this feeling to Budapest.

Photo: Sándor Csudai / WLB

Everything at the bakery is made fresh and traditionally. Pastel de nata may be the most typical (and sweetest) dessert, perfect with coffee. Its recipe was long safeguarded by families, but today, it is public property – at Lisboa, it is hanging on the wall. Simply explained, this is a small pastry filled with cream made from egg yolk, sprinkled with cinnamon and caramelised. Regular pastel de nata consumers always go for the darker-looking ones instead of the bright yellow treats.

Photo: Sándor Csudai / We Love Budapest

There’s a lot of bread in the bakery, they bake several types a day. Respecting the maturing and yeasting process results in something perfectly moist and chewy inside. They often sneak in flavours like curcumin, olives or prosciutto and parmesan.

Photo: Sándor Csudai / WLB

Prices are reasonable. ‘Grandma’s chocolate cake’ is 350 forints and the pastries start at 450 forints. Bread is slightly more expensive, some loaves costing 700-800 forints. Even though the view is of the Gozsdu Udvar rather than quaint trams, beautiful tiles and the Tagus, Lisboa still brings a bit of Portuguese atmosphere to Budapest.

 

Lisboa Pastry & Bakery

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Address: District VII. Holló utca 17