City guide

Delve into deranged minds at ‘Murder – The Killer Exhibition’ in Budapest

Photo : Attila Boldog / Murder

A unique exhibition in Budapest allows you to delve deep into the minds of the worst serial killers mankind has ever known, from Dracula to Ted Bundy. Entitled ‘Murder – The Killer Exhibition’ and running until 2019, it reveals sinister stories that speak of horrible crimes. Over a thousand square metres and across 21 rooms, its special effects stimulate your four senses and send chills down your spine. This interactive exhibition does not aim to present the most gruesome cases to turn your stomach, but to find reason in disturbed minds and see what makes a murderer.

Stepping inside the exhibition venue on Király utca, you immediately find yourself in a morgue, surrounded by the bodies of the victims of the most vicious murderers of all time – murderers whom you will soon meet. After a quick briefing and picking up your audio guide, you descend into darkness in an elevator; close your eyes and imagine that you are travelling in time and space to discover crime scenes that speak of horrible deeds from decades past.

Photo: Attila Boldog / Murder

Murder is not meant to scare you with silly tricks and sudden movements, so do not be afraid to walk around the various rooms, but do be aware that its peculiar props may freak you out somewhat. For a more realistic experience, the exhibition stimulates your four senses: special effects like UV lights, a fog screen and LED walls tease the eyes, scary sounds and a very dramatic commentary make your heart beat faster, and smells of rotting bodies and chemicals help take you to the scene. Rummaging through the room of a serial killer makes you feel like you’re a detective in CSI.

Photo: Attila Boldog / Murder

These rooms are all cleverly designed, with much to look at while you are listening to the gruesome tales. At one point, you’re the body in the fridge or witnessing an execution, at other times, you’re an outsider peeking in or uncovering a crime scene. Although Murder does not reveal the most in-depth details about these killers and their stories, the presentation and props give you an altogether unique experience.

Photo: Attila Boldog / Murder
Photo: Attila Boldog / Murder

As the exhibition’s creator actually believes that nobody is born evil, often Murder focuses on the background of these serial killers, trying to find the reasons why their lives went off track – abuse, humiliation, bullying. In the last space called the meditation room, you have time to seek into upset soul and dwell on these matters. Whether or not you’ll be convinced by the end that nobody is born evil, spending a few seconds thinking about how people treat each other and how that affects individuals is a nice final touch, is something worth contemplating.

Photo: Attila Boldog / Murder

An audio guide is available in four languages – English, German, Spanish and Hungarian. Small groups leave every ten minutes, which means that you never really have to wait too long, even if you didn’t buy your ticket online. A big advantage is that the audio guides are synchronised in all four languages, which means that the texts all end at the same time, so there is no awkward waiting around if you are in an international group. A guide always accompanies the group to assist you through your journey to the various layers of hell – feel free to turn to them with any questions. Please be aware that the exhibition is not recommended for those with epilepsy and you need to be at least 16 to enter.

 

The exhibition is on view until February 28th, 2019. More details