City guide

Budapest’s new “Bikeology” exhibit celebrates cycling in the city

Photo : Mudra László
Budapest’s new “Bikeology” exhibit celebrates cycling in the city

Now on view in the Museum of Applied Arts, an eco-friendly exhibition showcases a variety of innovative bicycles created by designers from 12 countries. In addition to several bikes that were never seen before in Budapest, the display also includes various cycling-related design products, as the exhibit’s main theme is the relationship between cycling and styling.

Titled “Bikeology”, the exhibition opened in cooperation of the Museum of Applied Arts and the Hungarian Museum of Science, Technology and Transport. The curators were curious about the creative meeting points of design and cycling, so the exhibition explores comfort, safety, style, and sports, but there is also great emphasis on environmentally friendly solutions, as well.
Photo: László Mudra
The exhibited objects were created by designers of 12 countries: Hungary, the Netherlands, Austria, Germany, Denmark, Britain, the United States, Sweden, Italy, Belgium, Australia, and Spain. Some items were brought over from the Hungarian Museum of Science, Technology and Transport as extra elements, as well, such as a special Puch bicycle.
Photo: László Mudra
The exhibition, curated by Kultúrgorilla, has a very logical structure with three distinct parts. The first section, titled Chain Links, explores the relationship of city dwellers and bicycle culture, and how cycling plays an important part in society. The second section is titled Tandem, and focuses on the relationship between cities and cycling. The third section, titled Critical Mass, is based on the popular Budapest event of the same name when the city’s bikers take over the streets, and examines how cycling can help the environment, and how it can contribute to solving global problems.
Photo: László Mudra
The exhibition can be visited until November 27th. “Bikeology” is an unusual and unique project, because it’s not about bicycles as much as cycling itself – it emphasizes how the number of cyclists in Budapest grew eleven-fold since 1990, and how it is inevitable to treat and develop this culture in an appropriate way. We recommend the exhibition to non-cyclists, too.