City guide

Photo Essay: Budapest courtyards skywards

Photo : Zsolt Hlinka
Kincsem Park, ló, verseny

On the occasion of the recent Budapest100 architectural celebration – an annual opportunity for the public to tour the interiors of many significant century-old Budapest buildings – creative Magyar photographer Zsolt Hlinka captured a stunning series of heavenly images of inner courtyards along Pest’s Grand Boulevard. The result is a fascinating interplay between geometry and cerulean skies.

Nagykörút
  • 1085 Budapest, Teréz körút
While Budapest100, an event that opened up some of Budapest’s 100-year-old buildings to the public with the Grand Boulevard in focus this year, the photos of Zsolt Hlinka offer another perspective on the insides of these old buildings. This is not the first time we’re writing about Hlinka’s unique building photographs, and even Designboom reported in his recent series. The online architecture and design magazine highlights that the photos’ special settings “draw attention to the hidden details often overlooked in buildings, like elevator shafts, window frames and brickwork”.
Photo: Zsolt Hlinka
The Grand Boulevard of Budapest was built in 1896 and is one of the busiest parts of the Hungarian capital today, with many long-standing buildings. Hlinka Zsolt took photographs from these buildings’ inner courtyards, pointing to the sky, and thus exaggerating the shape of the surfaces bordered by the buildings and the courtyards. According to his website, the buildings of the Grand Boulevard are reinterpreted as the location of the series because of the new perspective, and change our ordinary spatial perception. “As the buildings are framing the sky, the contrast is getting maximized between geometric, sealed networks of architectural forms. Looking at the accurately constructed, central photographs it feels like the buildings are tunnels driving to the infinity of the sky” – the photographer writes.

For those who’d like to see more works of these magical buildings, we recommend checking out the website and photos of Ákos Czigány, a few works of whose series, titled Hommage á Hiroshi Sugimoto, will soon be exhibited in New York.

Photo: Zsolt Hlinka
Photo: Zsolt Hlinka
Photo: Zsolt Hlinka
Photo: Zsolt Hlinka
Photo: Zsolt Hlinka
Photo: Zsolt Hlinka
Photo: Zsolt Hlinka
Photo: Zsolt Hlinka
Photo: Zsolt Hlinka